Livres en langue étrangère (VO)

  • Anglais Slanted 27 ; Portugal

    Collectif

    • Slanted
    • 1 June 2016

    Women with baskets full of fish belong to old postcard clichés back then. The cosmopolitan Lisbon is one of the last Western European capitals awakening from its deep slumber. In this 3 million metropole an upraising age group resists stereotypes of battered monuments and picturesque paved alleys and looks nervously at the future with a steady attempt to catch up lost time.

    Other Portuguese cities pass through a similar renaissance. Slanted's journey took them from Lisbon to Porto with a stop in Coimbra, visiting all in all 27 studios. Some people said that Lisbon was the woman while Porto was the man. The first one more smooth and emotional while the northern one is more kind of direct and rational. For both of them, old and new seem to clash with tradition and avant-garde.

    Historic factories such as Viúva Lamego (tiles) and Viarco (pencils) proved that they were able to redefine themselves without losing their souls. Same goes for the new energetic generation of designers that grew up with the financial crisis and unemployment: time has come to redefine the dramatic change of their country, influencing all aspects of cultural life.

    The issue is thematically complemented by illustrations, photography, interviews and essays.

    Visits and authors: Rui Abreu, Aka Corleone, And Atelier, Atelier d'Alves, Emanuel Barbosa, José Bártolo, Bolos Quentes, Bürocratik, Tiago Casanova, Joana Correia, Studio Dobra, Júlio Dolbeth, Dino dos Santos, DROP, João Drumond, Epiforma, FBA., Luis Fernandes, Charlotte von Fritschen, José Guilherme Marques, Studio Andrew Howard, küng design bureau, André Letria, Lara Luís, Ian Lynam, Dermot Mac Cormack, João Machado, Mantraste, Joana Monteiro, Mother Volcano, Musa, Inês Nepomuceno, non-verbal, Márcia Novais, Inês d'Orey, Oupas!, Pedrita, R2 Design, Mariana Rio, Violeta Santos-Moura, Ana Seixas, silvadesigners, Sonja Steppan, Studio Chris Steurer, The Royal Studio, Thisislove, Tomba Lobos, Viarco, Rui Vitorino Santos, Viúva Lamego factory, White Studio, Aaron Winters, Xesta Studio.

  • Anglais SLANTED n.28 ; warsaw

    Slanted

    • Slanted
    • 2 November 2016

    Once known as Paris of the North, the capital of Poland ceased to exist only to rise like a phoenix from the ashes.
    This summer, Slanted dips into the refreshing deep pool of contemporary design made in Warsaw.
    Design in Poland was carved by the Polish school of poster art that was shaped by legendary graphic designers, painters, architects and artists such as Henryk Tomaszewski, Tadeusz Trepkowski, Jan Lenica, Roman Cieslewicz, Walerian Borowczyk, Franciszek Starowieyski, Waldemar Swierzy, Wojciech Fangor, Franciszek Starowieyski, Roslaw Szaybo, Maciej Hübner, Mieczyslaw Wasilewski, and many others.
    In Communist Poland, art and culture enjoyed a surprising amount of freedom: After the end of the Stalin era in 1956, Big Brother's grip on the country loosened. Greater freedom was permitted in art, literature and the theatre and support was given to cultural events and art schools. There was a tremendous upsurge in creative output. In 1966 the first »International Poster Biennale« was held and in 1968 the world's first poster museum was opened in Wilanow near Warsaw.
    But where there is art, there is also protest. For artists it was a constant testing of the borders - just how much criticism of the poorly functioning state-run economy was possible? It was a time in which the Polish poster excelled for its intelligence and wit. Following the collapse of Communism in 1989/90, the flow of money stopped.
    Advertising looked to the West for direction, the benefits of uniformity arrived in Poland. Since then, a lot changed !

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