Richard Adams

  • C'est parfois dans les collines verdoyantes et idylliques que se terrent les plus terrifiantes menaces. C'est là aussi que va se dérouler cette vibrante épopée de courage, de loyauté et de survie. Menés par le valeureux Hazel, une poignée de braves choisit de fuir l'inéluctable destruction de leur foyer. Prémonitions, ruses, légendes vont aider ces héros face à mille ennemis et les guider jusqu'à leur terre promise, Watership Down. Mais l'aventure s'arrêtera-t-elle là ? Aimé par des millions de lecteurs, l'envoûtant roman de Richard Adams fait partie de ces odyssées sombres néanmoins parcourues d'espoir et de poésie. Vous sentirez le sang versé. Vous tremblerez face aux dangers. Vous craindrez la mort. Et plus que tout, vous ressentirez l'irrépressible désir de savoir ce qui va se passer.

  • Here is the enchanting sequel to the beloved classic Watership Down, which introduced millions of readers to an extraordinary world of rabbits--including Fiver, Hazel, Bigwig, Dandelion, and the legendary hero El-ahrairah. Tales From Watership Down returns to these unforgettable characters, and also presents new heroes as they struggle to survive the cruelties of nature and the shortsighted selfishness of humankind, embark on new adventures, and recount traditional stories of rabbit mythology, charming us once again with imagination, heart, and wonder. A spellbinding book of courage and survival, these tales are an exciting invitation to come home to a beloved world.

  • "Thousands and thousands of people will love this book!"
    THE BOSTON GLOBE
    A lyrical, engrossing tale, by the author of WATERSHIP DOWN, Richard Adams creates a lyrical and engrossing tale, a remarkable journey into the hearts and minds of two canine heroes, Snitter and Rowf, fugitives from the horrors of an animal research center who escape into the isolation--and terror--of the wilderness.

  • Ce livre propose un tableau de l'État romain à partir de sa création au VIe siècle, sous influence étrusque, jusqu'à l'instauration d'une monarchie de fait en 27 av. J.-C. Par grandes périodes, indépendamment du strict événementiel, sont d'abord présentés les principes de la citoyenneté, puis ceux qui régissaient l'oligarchie dirigeante, sénat, magistrats, prêtres, plébéiens riches et chevaliers. Une évolution pluriséculaire mène de la tribu itinérante - avec ses clans spécialisés - à une république organisée suivant le modèle de l'armée et, finalement, à une autocratie bureaucratique qui, tout en conservant le vocabulaire et les exemples de la République, est une monarchie à peine déguisée.

  • A poetic account of the dialogue Richards has conducted with the river during half a century of listening to the whisper and gurgle of its myriad voices - a lyrical evocation of the sights, sounds and scents of a great Canadian waterway' - The Sunday HeraldLines on the Water is the story of a town, its river and the community of people who fish in it. David Adams Richards is a prize-winning author but when he's not writing, he's mostly fishing and when he's fishing it's always along the banks of the Miramichi river. This great river and the poachers, guides, visiting city suits and friends who share it with him have woven themselves into the fabric of his life and in Lines on the Water he pays tribute to them all. Spinning fishy tale after glorious fishy tale we join him and his companions on the endless search for the next great fishing pool and along the way remember why we love to read, and why we have to fish.

  • The novel tells the story of Sydney Henderson and his son, Lyle. As a young man, Sydney, believing he has accidentally killed a friend, makes a pact with God, promising never to harm another if the boy's life is spared. In the years that follow the almost pathologically gentle Sydney tries to hold true to his promise - at terrible cost to himself and his family.

  • Janie McCleary runs one of the first movie theatres in New Brunswick. A successful woman in a world of men, she is ostracized, a victim of double-dealing and overt violence. She trusts no one outside her family. Spanning generations, River of the Brokenhearted explores the life of this formidable woman, a pioneer before the age of feminism, and her legacy as it unfolds tragically in the lives of her son and grandchildren. Written with aching compassion and masterful sophistication, River of the Brokenhearted muses on the tyranny of memory and history, and peers into the hearts of these extraordinary characters.By the author of Mercy Among the Children.

  • Will Jameson has a temperament of iron, standing up to men twice his age when he takes over the Jameson lumber company after his father's death. His younger brother Owen is sensitive, literary and fanciful. But when Will dies suddenly and Owen's beloved Lula rejects him, Owen's deeper character comes to light: joining the army in the hope of getting himself killed, instead Owen returns home a decorated war hero. Then he falls in love with the beautiful, childlike Camellia - the wife of Will's old friend Reggie Glidden - and soon Owen and Camellia find themselves watched on all sides, caught in the teeth of an entire town's gossip and hypocrisy. Inexorably, they are pulled into a chain of events that will end with death, disappearance and a sensational trial. The Friends of Meager Fortune is a transfixing love story and a devastating portrait of a society - but it is also a brilliant commemoration of the passing of a world, that of the lumberjacks who felled the trees by hand and dragged them down mountainsides with horses. Owen Jameson begins what will become the greatest cut in New Brunswick history, his men setting up camp on the notoriously dangerous Good Friday Mountain. The teamsters spend months in pitiless ice and snow, daily pitting themselves against nature and risking their lives for scant reward, in the last moments before the coming of mechanization that will make them obsolete. This heroic, brutal life is all Meager Fortune, the camp keeper, knows. A good and innocent man, he shows unexpected resolution in the face of the betrayals of the more worldly men around him. Rich with all the passion, ambition and almost mythic vision that defines David Adams Richards' work, The Friends of Meager Fortune is a profound and important book about the hands and the heart; about true greatness and true weakness; about the relentlessness of fate and the evil that men and women do. Wise, stark, and without a false word in it, it cements David Adams Richards' claim to be the finest novelist at work in Canada today.

  • David Adams Richards takes us behind his gun and into the Canadian forest for his most powerful work of non-fiction yet.
    In his brilliant non-fiction, David Adams Richards - first and foremost one of Canada's greatest and best-beloved novelists - has been writing a kind of memoir by other means. Like his previous titles Lines On Water, about his pursuit of angling, and Hockey Dreams, about the game his disabled body prevented him from playing, Facing the Hunter explores the meaning of a sport and the way in which it touches lives, not least that of the author. And as with God Is, his recent book about his faith, it is also an impassioned defence of a set of values and a way of life that Richards believes are under attack.
    Lovers of David Adams Richards' novels will be fascinated and enlightened to note the interplay between his former life as a keen hunter - he hunts less and less these days, as he explains - and the narratives and characters of his fiction. But this is also a perfect starting point for anyone coming new to Richards. The storytelling in this book, the evocation of the Canadian wild and those who venture into it, the sheer power of the prose, show a great writer at the height of his powers.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • With a voice as Canadian as winter, David Adams Richards reflects on the place of hockey in the Canadian soul.
    The lyrical narrative of Hockey Dreams flows from Richards' boyhood games on the Miramichi to heated debates with university professors who dare to back the wrong team. It examines the globalization of hockey, and how Canadians react to the threat of foreigners beating us at "our" game.
    Part memoir, part essay on national identity, part hockey history, Hockey Dreams is a meditation by one of Canada's finest writers on the essence of the game that helps define our nation.

  • In the 1920s, Janie McLeary and George King run one of the first movie theatres in the Maritimes. The marriage of the young Irish Catholic woman to an older English man is thought scandalous, but they work happily together, playing music to accompany the films. When George succumbs to illness and dies, leaving Janie with one young child and another on the way, the unscrupulous Joey Elias tries to take over the business. But Janie guards the theatre with a shotgun, and still in mourning, re-opens it herself. "If there was no real bliss in Janie's life," recounts her grandson, "there were moments of triumph."
    One night, deceived by the bank manager and Elias into believing she will lose her mortgage, Janie resolves to go and ask for money from the Catholic houses. Elias has sent out men to stop her, so she leaps out the back window and with a broken rib she swims in the dark across the icy Miramichi River, doubting her own sanity. Yet, seeing these people swayed into immoral actions because of their desire to please others and their fear of being outcast, she thinks to herself that "...all her life she had been forced to act in a way uncommon with others... Was sanity doing what they did? And if it was, was it moral or justified to be sane?"
    Astonishingly, she finds herself face to face that night with influential Lord Beaverbrook, who sees in her tremendous character and saves her business. Not only does she survive, she prospers; she becomes wealthy, but ostracized. Even her own father helps Elias plot against her. Yet Janie McLeary King thwarts them and brings first-run talking pictures to the town.
    Meanwhile, she employs Rebecca from the rival Druken family to look after her children. Jealous, and a protégé of Elias, Rebecca mistreats her young charges. The boy Miles longs to be a performer, but Rebecca convinces him he is hated, and he inherits his mother's enemies. The only person who truly loves her, he is kept under his mother's influence until, eventually, he takes a job as the theatre's projectionist. He drinks heavily all his life, tends his flowers, and talks of things no-one believes, until the mystery at the heart of the novel finally unravels.
    "At six I began to realize that my father was somewhat different," says Miles King's son Wendell, who narrates the saga in an attempt to find answers in the past and understand "how I was damned." It is a many-layered epic of rivalries, misunderstandings, rumours; the abuse of power, what weak people will do for love, and the true power of doing right; of a pioneer and her legacy in the lives of her son and grandchildren.
    "David Adams Richards is perhaps the greatest Canadian writer alive," wrote Lynn Coady in the Vancouver Sun. From this winner of the Giller Prize and the Governor General's Award comes a story of a woman's determined struggle against small town prejudice, and her son's long battle against deceit. Richards' own family ran Newcastle's Uptown Theatre from 1911 to 1980, and Janie is based on his grandmother. Cast upon this history is a drama that explores morality and "the question of how one should live," as The Atlantic Monthly said of Mercy Among the Children, his previous novel.
    Reviewers agree that Richards' fiction sits firmly in the tradition of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky by concerning itself explicitly with good and evil and the human freedom to choose between them. Once again, in River of the Brokenhearted, his twelfth novel, Richards has created a work of compassion and assured, poetic sophistication which finds in the hearts of its characters venality and goodwill, cruelty and love.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • David Adams Richards' Governor General's Award-winning novel is a powerful tale of resignation and struggle, fierce loyalties and compassion. This book is the first in Richards' acclaimed Miramichi trilogy. Set in a small mill town in northern New Brunswick, it draws us into the lives of a community of people who live there, including: Joe Walsh, isolated and strong in the face of a drinking problem; his wife, Rita, willing to believe the best about people; and their teenage daughter Adele, whose nature is rebellious and wise, and whose love for her father wars with her desire for independence. Richards' unforgettable characters are linked together in conflict, and in articulate love and understanding. Their plight as human beings is one we share.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • With great recipes for meats, sauces and rubs mixed with ideas for pickles, slaws, puddings and cocktails, plus features on meats, equipment and methods, the Pitt Cue Co. Cookbook is your guide to enjoying the best hot, smoky, sticky, spicy grub all year round.From Pitt Cue's legendary Pickle backs and bourbon cocktails, to their acclaimed Pulled pork shoulder; Burnt ends mash; Smoked ox cheek toasts with pickled walnuts; Lamb rib with molasses mop and onion salad; Chipotle & confit garlic slaw; Crispy pickled shiitake mushrooms; Toffee apple grunt; Sticky bourbon & cola pudding and so much more, it's all irresistibly delicious food to savour and share.

  • Press baron, entrepreneur, art collector, and wartime minister in Churchill's cabinet, Max Aitken was a colonial Canadian extraordinaire. Rising from a hardscrabble childhood in New Brunswick, he became a millionaire at age 25, earned the title of Lord Beaverbrook at 38, and by age 40 was the most influential newspaperman in the world. Fiercely loyal to the British Empire, he was nonetheless patronized by London's upper class, whose country he worked tirelessly to protect during World War II. David Adams Richards, one of Canada's preeminent novelists, celebrates Beaverbrook's heroic achievements in this perceptive interpretive biography.

  • A brilliant, heartbreaking novel from a Canadian icon that tackles the theme of debt, and what we owe each other, through three unforgettable characters. This is Richards' best and most complex work since his Giller-winning Mercy Among the Children, and a fitting companion to that novel.
    Howard, Evan and Ian are inseparable as boys--so much so that one night, abandoned in the forest by the careless adults around them, and raging against society and the uncaring gods others worship, they seal their undying brotherhood with a blood bond. But soon after, a horrific accident scars each of them in a different way, testing their bonds and leaving each with a debt to be paid. As adults, seeking to rise above debt and advance in life, each man decides upon a very different path--but over time, all three discover they are tied to each other in intricately tangled, sometimes violent, and surprising ways that none of them has been wise enough to foresee.
    In Crimes Against My Brother, literary legend David Adams Richards is at his finest, reprising some of his most complex and beloved characters (such as Sydney Henderson from Mercy Among the Children), introducing unforgettable new ones (such as the beautiful but fatally foolish Annette Brideau; and the wily, charming, money-hungry manipulator Lonnie Sullivan), and weaving a tale of such force, gravitas, complexity, universality, and compassionate understanding that he reaffirms his status as a master storyteller who has, book by book, used his rare genius to create an entire, teeming universe alongside a river in a small northern part of the world.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • From pick-up secrets to mind-blowing sex, everything a guy needs to give and receive perfect pleasure.
    One of the most recognizable names in porn, Adam Glasser has slept with more than six hundred women, on and off camera. In his first book, this professional Casanova reveals the naked truth about getting laid, addressing the nitty-gritty questions that amateur sexperts never even thought to ask.
    Rock Her World features three sections (About You, About Her, About Sex) that cover everything a man needs to know about male and female anatomy, with eye-opening explanations of a woman's orgasm, and surprising findings about what women really want in bed. From foreplay and oral sex to intercourse, all aspects of sex are demystified. The details of contraception, sex toys, anal sex, spanking, and the art of seduction are hammered home alongside hilarious anecdotes from Glasser's career (including one peculiar costar's climax-control technique). Fleshed out with illustrations (both instructional and comical), Rock Her World gives every man a chance to learn the art of world-class lovemaking from a legendary insider.

  • Growing up in a prominent lumber family in the Miramichi, brothers Will and Owen Jameson know little of the world beyond their town and the great men who work the forest, including their father. But as young men, the boys couldn';t be more different -- where seventeen-year-old Will is headstrong and rugged, able to hold his own in the woods or in a fight, Owen, three years his junior, is literary and sensitive. What worries their mother Mary, however, is the prophecy told to her by a local woman upon Will';s birth: "that her first-born would be a powerful man and have much respect -- but his brother would be even greater, yet destroy the legacy by rashness, and the Jameson dynasty [would] not go beyond that second boy." She tries to laugh it off, but the prophecy becomes a part of local legend and hangs over the heads of the boys like a dark cloud.
    When their father dies in a freak accident and the management of the Jameson tracts and company falters, Will, as the true inheritor of his father';s "shrewd mind and fists to match," quits school to take over. He';s a strong leader of men, but perhaps too strong at times, and dies while clearing a log jam during a run. Reggie Glidden, Will';s best friend and the Push of the Jameson team, takes Owen under his wing, searching for any small sign that the younger boy has his brother';s qualities. But Owen knows his limitations and, after his brother';s death and then rejection by the girl of his dreams, Lula Brower, he joins he army and heads off to war hoping to get himself killed. Instead, he returns a decorated war hero.
    Then he falls in love with the beautiful, childlike Camellia -- the wife of Reggie Glidden -- and soon Owen and Camellia find themselves watched on all sides, caught in the teeth of an entire town';s gossip and hypocrisy despite the innocence of their relationship. But for the community, it';s as if taking Owen Jameson -- and therefore the whole Jameson family -- down a peg or two will give them control over their changing world. Inexorably, Owen and Camellia are pulled into a chain of events that will end with death, disappearance, and a sensational trial.
    At the same time, realizing his destiny, Owen takes over the family business and begins what will become the greatest cut in New Brunswick history, his men setting up camp on the notoriously dangerous Good Friday Mountain. The teamsters spend months in fierce ice and snow, daily pitting themselves against nature and risking their lives for scant reward, in the last moments before the coming of mechanization that will make them obsolete. This heroic, brutal life is all Meager Fortune, the camp keeper, knows. A good and innocent man, he shows unexpected resolution in the face of the betrayals of the more worldly men around him.
    With The Friends of Meager Fortune, award-winning author David Adams Richards continues his exploration of New Brunswick';s Miramichi Valley, both the hard lives and experiences that emerge from that particular soil and the universal human matters that concern us all: the work of the hands and the heart; the nature of true greatness and true weakness; the relentlessness of fate and the good and evil that men and women do. It is a devastating portrait of a society, but it is also a brilliant commemoration of the passing of a world -- one that cements David Adams Richards'; place as the finest novelist at work in Canada today.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Mercy Among the Children received effusive praise from the critics, was nominated for a Governor General';s Award and won the Giller Prize. It was named one of 2000';s best books, became a national bestseller in hardcover for months, and would be published in the US and UK. It is seen, however, as being at odds with literary fashion for concerning itself with good and evil and the human freedom to choose between them -- an approach that puts Richards, as Maclean';s magazine says, firmly in the tradition of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. Author Wayne Johnston recounts hearing Richards read in 1983 and being struck by his unqualified love for every one of his characters, even though "it was not then fashionable to love your characters". Pottersfield Portfolio editor Tony Tremblay calls Richards the most misunderstood Canadian writer of the century, and a "great moralist", comparing him to Morley Callaghan, Kafka and Melville.
    As a boy, Sydney Henderson thinks he has killed Connie Devlin when he pushes him from a roof for stealing his sandwich. He vows to God he will never again harm another if Connie survives. Connie walks away, laughing, and Sydney embarks upon a life of self-immolating goodness. In spite of having educated himself with such classics as Tolstoy and Marcus Aurelius, he is not taken seriously enough to enter university because of his background of dire poverty and abuse, which leads everyone to expect the worst of him. His saintly gnerosity of spirit is treated with suspicion and contempt, especially when he manages to win the love of beautiful Elly. Unwilling to harm another in thought or deed, or to defend himself against false accusations, he is exploited and tormented by others in this rural community, and finally implicated in the death of a 19-year-old boy.
    Lyle Henderson knows his father is innocent, but is angry that the family has been ridiculed for years, and that his mother and sister suffer for it. He feels betrayed by his father';s passivity in the face of one blow after another, and unable to accept his belief in long-term salvation. Unlike his father, he cannot believe that evil will be punished in the end. While his father turns the other cheek, Lyle decides the right way is in fighting, and embarks on a morally empty life of stealing, drinking and violence.
    A compassionate, powerful story of humanity confronting inhumanity, it is a culmination of Richards'; last seven books, beginning with Road to the Stilt House. It takes place in New Brunswick';s Miramichi Valley, like all of his novels so far, which has led some urban critics to misjudge his work as regional -- a criticism leveled at Thomas Hardy, Joseph Conrad and Emily Bronte in their own day. Like his literary heroes, Richards aims to evoke universal human struggles through his depiction of the events of a small, rural place, where one person';s actions impact inevitably on others in a tragic web of interconnectedness. The setting is extremely important in Richards'; work, "because the characters come from the soil"; but as British Columbia author Jack Hodgins once told Richards, "every character you talk about is a character I've met here in Campbell River".

  • The masterful new novel from a Canadian literary legend at the height of his powers.
    John Delano is a broken man, seemingly at the end of everything: the end of his legendary but controversial career as a police officer; the end of his sad and difficult marriage; the end of his years-long search for the truth of what happened to his missing son; the end of his fruitless quest for personal redemption; even, perhaps, the end of his life. Only one small thing keeps him going: his conviction that he has a final case to solve, centred around the disappearance years ago of a young boy placed in foster care in Saint John, New Brunswick. Following the delicate and convoluted thread of that case takes John to unexpected places: dangerously close to powerful civil servants hoarding damning secrets; to a Canadian humanitarian mission in Rwanda before and during the genocide; to New York and the compromised corridors of the United Nations; and deep into his own haunted past.
    With this new masterwork, David Adams Richards continues to astonish us, weaving familiar themes in fresh new ways. His people are still rooted in his beloved Miramichi region of New Brunswick, but his storytelling--as always, displaying his genius for plot and his extraordinary empathy for his flawed characters--has expanded to encompass the much wider world that his people traverse: the politically charged, intricately connected modern universe in all its richness, contradiction, devastation and little points of hope. In the end, what ties John Delano to every other unforgettable character in this compelling work is the shared search for principles to live by: as each person decides what those principles shall be, their fates inevitably and heartbreakingly intertwine.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • L'histoire se déroule dans une région forestière du Nouveau-Brunswick entre1960 et 2000 et s'inspire, en fond de toile, des empires à la Irving et autres grandes papetières. C'est un monde sauvage qui sent la pulpe et l'épinette, peuplé de petites gens et de petits voyous.

    Le roman débute avec le terrible incendie de la propriété de Leo McVicer. Forêt et usine gisent sous les cendres. C'est une catastrophe pour toute la région. On accuse à tort le grand-père Roy Henderson. Tous parlent de la malédiction Henderson et réclament un châtiment. Entre révolte et stoïcisme, la famille Henderson fait alors face à l'injustice et ira de malheur en malheur. Roy sombre dans la déchéance avant de mourir lamentablement en prison. Son fils Sydney, qui doit assurer la relève et prendre ses responsabilités familiales, se jure de ne jamais être responsable du malheur d'autrui, mais c'est sans compter avec la rumeur et l'acharnement funeste de tout un village à le rendre, avec sa famille, responsable de tous les maux qui accablent le voisinage. Jusqu'au jour où son propre fils, le jeune Lyle, décide de se rebeller et de prendre son destin en main.

  • In anesthesiology, pain medicine, and critical care, practitioners at all levels need help to stay current with the continually evolving drug knowledge-base and trainees need tools to prepare for in-training and board exams that increasingly test their knowledge of pharmacology. This practical book is aimed at both readerships. It features a unique and practical chapter on the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) "black box" warnings that describe what safety precautions should be taken with commonly used drugs. The editors and contributors are pharmacology experts representing a cross-section of clinical specialties and institutions in the United States and include pharmacologists, pharmacists, as well as physicians.

  • Figure 1-1. Post-World War II US assessment history. 1973)weremotivatedbytheemergingcon?ictsinthepost-WorldWar II period between rapidly increasing softwood harvests and declining timber growth. These are called the Outlook Studies. The last six studies (1980, 1985, 1989, 1993, 2000, 2005) have been conducted to meet the requirements of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) of 1974. These are called the RPA Timber Assessments. 6 The Challenge of Developing Models 1. 2 SHAPING THE ASSESSMENT SYSTEM This initial chapter describes the development and speci?c structure of the Assessment System. We consider past policy analysis needs and federal legislative requirements, antecedent modeling and projection approaches, characteristics of the US forest sector, and recent trends in public and private resource management. At the federal level, and in some states and regions, the USA has a lengthy history of using resource and market models to explore policy issues and to examine the e?ects of alternative policy actions. Many of these studies have been undertaken on an irregular basis as issues emerged and resource conditions changed. The RPA legislation mandated a regular cycle of nationwide assessments by the Forest Service, examining trends and conditionsinanarrayofresourceusesandservices(climate,minerals, range,recreation,timber,andwater). ThestructureoftheAssessment System re?ects both the requirements of the RPA legislation and the unique characteristics of the US forest sector, which it is designed to simulate. IntheyearssinceenactmentoftheRPAlegislation,mana- ment directions, and objectives on both public and private lands in the USA have continued to evolve. The structure of the Assessment System has been adapted to re?ect these trends.

  • L'histoire se déroule dans une région forestière du Nouveau-Brunswick entre1960 et 2000 et s'inspire, en fond de toile, des empires à la Irving et autres grandes papetières. C'est un monde sauvage qui sent la pulpe et l'épinette, peuplé de petites gens et de petits voyous.

    Le roman débute avec le terrible incendie de la propriété de Leo McVicer. Forêt et usine gisent sous les cendres. C'est une catastrophe pour toute la région. On accuse à tort le grand-père Roy Henderson. Tous parlent de la malédiction Henderson et réclament un châtiment. Entre révolte et stoïcisme, la famille Henderson fait alors face à l'injustice et ira de malheur en malheur. Roy sombre dans la déchéance avant de mourir lamentablement en prison. Son fils Sydney, qui doit assurer la relève et prendre ses responsabilités familiales, se jure de ne jamais être responsable du malheur d'autrui, mais c'est sans compter avec la rumeur et l'acharnement funeste de tout un village à le rendre, avec sa famille, responsable de tous les maux qui accablent le voisinage. Jusqu'au jour où son propre fils, le jeune Lyle, décide de se rebeller et de prendre son destin en main.

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